Delayed onset acute massive haemothorax after traumatic rib fractures-A Case Report

Vol 7 | Issue 2 | May-August 2021 | Page: 14-16 | Wael Hassan


Author: Wael Hassan [1]

[1] Department of Anaesthesia, Crumlin Hospital, Ireland.

Address of Correspondence
Dr. Wael Hassan
Department of Anaesthesia, Crumlin Hospital, Ireland.
E-mail: waelhismail@gmail.com


Delayed onset acute massive haemothorax after traumatic rib fractures-A Case Report


Abstract

Rib fractures are common injuries that frequently necessitate intensive care admission for pain management, respiratory support, in addition to managing possible complications. The most common complications of rib fractures are pain, haemothorax, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions and lacerations, vascular injuries, and intra-abdominal organ injury. After a high impact road traffic accident, a polytrauma 26-year-old Irish gentleman presented with right-sided posterior rib series fractures (from 8th to 12th rib), lung contusion, hepatic laceration, pelvic ring crush injury and urinary bladder disruption. Resuscitation and emergency management including suprapubic catheterisation and external pelvic fixation were performed successfully. Although complications of multiple rib fractures were excluded clinically and radiologically on admission, the patient developed acute massive haemothorax 5 days after the primary injury which has been managed appropriately. This incident raises the concern that haemothoraces and pneumothoraces can occur late after the original injury and high level of suspicion associated with follow-up chest x-ray images are essential in patients with rib fractures.
Keywords: Polytrauma, Rib fracture, Haemothorax.


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How to Cite this Article: Hassan W. Delayed onset acute massive haemothorax after traumatic rib fractures: A case report | Journal of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Case Reports | May-August 2021; 7(2): 14-16.

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